George Washington Union Freemasonry

When I joined freemasonry, it began with a dark and clouded knowledge of what else was out there. I never realized that there were “other” branches of Freemasonry that existed and practiced what I did. My honest thought was that all Masonic Lodges were under a uniform body, all practicing and adhering to one principal.

As I progressed and learned more I was still unaware of all that exists in the cosmos of Freemasonry. Once I realized that there were a variety of branches, I realized how naive I had been to think there was only one flavor of the “fraternity”. That, like the Acacia we hold so revrently, there existed many varities(the Acacia genus having about 800 species).

Over the next few weeks, I plan to post other examples of “different” Freemasonry than what most know as “Regular” here in the United States. I’d like to introduce them and say a little to pull back this veil to the idea of “One Freemasonry One Way”.

Here is a branch of Freemasonry that I was unaware of up until a few months ago called:
George Washington Union (GWU) Freemasonry, which is a mixed body of Freemasonry that “refers to the tradition of The Constitutions of Anderson published in 1723 and is open to both Men and Women. It is a contemporary organization adhering to the ethical values shared by all Men and Women of good will. Its main principles are absolute liberty of conscience and freedom. Furthermore, the basic rules that guide us are tolerance and the respect of all beliefs as well as for all human beings. It does not refer to any exclusive dogma. Its purpose is to promote individual and global social progress and mutual understanding among people having different origins and cultures and to act as a bridge overcoming all prejudices. It does not refer to any particular political or religious doctrine and leaves this consideration to the individual conscience of the members who are totally free in their religious, philosophical and political choices – as long as the concepts adopted do not teach hostile, discriminating or racial principles.”

They have a strong belief in the inclusion of woman in masonry and disagree with being restrictive. Also, it is an open system that allows lodges to practice in what ever degree they choose be it French, Scottish, English, etc.

I have met several individuals from this lodge and find their Masonic knowledge to be very strong and their conversations enlightening. To most Freemasons, anyone from this group would be considered clandestine, which translates to them not being charted by a “recognized” body of Freemasonry. These same people would deem the heritical and not Freemasons. But I suggest as a question to you, What makes someone a Freemason?

Is this group part of Freemasonry’s evolution? Perhaps realizing that there are bodies of Freemasonry that exist outside the norm of what we know to be “regular” will be the first step in truly being a Universal Brotherhood.

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~ by Greg on January 30, 2006.

3 Responses to “George Washington Union Freemasonry”

  1. Well put!

  2. Regarding Freemasonry,borrowing from Clinton’s first campaign slogan, “it’s the “Obligation” stupid!”

    Reminds me of a conversation I had last week with a PM in my lodge. I talked about “co-masonry” and he looked at me like I was speaking Greek. He’d never heard of “other” masons before! And he wasn’t alone either!

    Whether or not we like it, the future of Freemasonry may in fact lie in the “clandestine” movements as us “regular’s” are becomming increasingly scarce and alarmingly irrelevant.

  3. If you were to start all over, what ‘flavor’ would you choose ?

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