Belief.net

I was searching the other day and ran across the site belief.net. It is a free membership based resource, online since 1999, whose focus is a multi-denominational approach to a web community offering support groups, prayer groups, friendship circles, and tracts of wisdom.

It is an interesting site, and one I would recommend any traveler to investigate. How it is relevant to Freemasonry is that in searching it’s database, there were only a few mentions of Freemasonry, and in my own opinion presented in a negative way. Described in one article as “The goofy internal lingo of Masonic temple”, writer Gregg Easterbrook compares politicians today to the “Masonic” founding fathers see – “Bible-Cutters, Mystics, and Masons” with the analysis of if “George Washington or Abraham Lincoln were alive today-or Thomas Jefferson, for that matter–their spiritual beliefs would be far more controversial than Bushs, and not just because times change.”

Or in another article, by writer Deborah Caldwell, asks “Were the Founding Fathers related to Jesus”. This piece is an editors pick for the site, and top amongst the results from a search on Freemasonry. The article itself is an analysis of the movie National Treasure and it’s connection to “Knights Templar, Freemasonry, a secret map on the Declaration of Independence, and a super-secret stash of treasure.”. It is a brief historical analysis, but again paints the fraternity to be a band of Templer following lunks, assuming unashamedly that there are no connections with Freemasonry, Templers, and so on.

If your curious, here is what I recommend you do. Go to belief.net, sign-up for a membership, and search Freemasonry. See for yourself what is out there.

In so many spaces Freemasonry is under represented and left open to detractors. We need to be diligent about what Freemasonry represents and how we get that message out. Saying nothing on line and in the real world is just as bad as doing the wrong thing. We need to wake up and organize our efforts.

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~ by Greg on January 24, 2006.

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